Close Protection Operations

Mihail Păduraru



International terminology – acronyms

CP – Close Protection

EP – Executive Protection

VIP / PRINCIPAL /CLIENT / PROTEGEE – Protected person

TL – Team Leader

PSD – Personal Security Detail

PSO – Personal Security Officer

PPO – Personal Protection Officer

SAC – Security Agent in Charge

SL – Shift Leader

RF – Right Flank

LF – Left Flank

RA – Rear Agent

CS – Counter Surveillance

SD – Security Driver

CPT – Close Protection Team

CAT – Counter Assault Team

AT – Advance Team

RST – Residence Security Team

PMC – Private Military Contractor

PMC – Private Military Company

MC – Military Contractor

CC – Client Car

FC – Front Car

RC – Rear Car / Follow Car

THE USE OF VARIOUS ACRONYMS AND TERMINOLOGY DEPENDS ON
THE OPERATION AREA, THREAT, AND CP TEAM 
COMPOSITION



GENERAL OBJECTIVE

CP agent’s responsibilities

An agent’s responsibility is to provide security and protection to their client regardless of the place, time and circumstances. A VIP client must be provided with a security area preventing life, health, or dignity-threatening situations (such as ridiculing) to ensure that they can feel safe doing their day-to-day activities.

GENERAL PROVISIONS

A perfect CP agent must be aware of his/her responsibilities. These do not consist only in protecting the client against a planned attack. 

The following three major issues should be taken into account:

1. Intentional injury

2. Unintentional injury

3. Ridicule

This work does not only mean flying to exotic countries, driving luxurious cars, wearing fine suits and dark sunglasses, meeting interesting people and spending time with them; in general, doing those things that we normally would not be able to do.

FIRST OF ALL, THIS WORK MEANS GREAT RESPONSIBILITY, LONG AND LONELY GUARDS OFTEN IN UNUSUAL PLACES, NO PRIVATE LIFE, WORKING UNDER CONSTANT PRESSURE, PERMANENT TRAININGS AND SYSTEMATIC SELF-IMPROVEMENT...


TYPES OF THREATS

• manslaughter

• kidnapping/abduction

• health impairment/injuries

• ridicule/humiliation

• slander

MAJOR COMPONENTS AND PILLARS OF PROTECTION

All CP teams are obliged to develop a security system involving people, procedures and equipment which – if the VIP’s security is threatened – aims at:
• avoiding the threat,

• detecting the threat,

• overcoming and preventing the possible danger regardless of the type and degree of the threat

FIVE MAJOR PILLARS OF SECURITY ORGANISATION INCLUDE:

• PLANNING

• ACCESS TO INFORMATION SOURCES

• ASSIGNING RESPONSIBILITIES TO TEAM MEMBERS

• PEOPLE AND INFORMATION CONTROL

• COOPERATION BETWEEN SECURITY SERVICES

- SECURITY CORDONS around a VIP and his/her residence (draw a plan)
• inner cordon

• intermediate cordon

• outer cordon



ELEMENTS OF CLOSE PROTECTION TEAM 
INSIDE SECURITY TEAM

TEAM LEADER/PSO, SECURITY AGENT IN CHARGE

• responsible for all aspects and coordination of the mission,

• receives his/her VIP’s list of arrangements and a daily schedule,

• receives a work protocol/diplomatic protocol on the particular mission,

• each time initiates, collects, evaluates and estimates every individual threat,

• develops or evaluates and approves security plans,

• selects and assumes responsibility for the security team members

• assumes responsibility for the VIP’s closest CP agents,

• is responsible for the VIP’s evacuation in case of emergency,

• is always present in the VIP’s closest surroundings, excluding private or intimate situations,

• is an exclusive contact person between the VIP and the other CP agents,

• if necessary, informs the VIP about the present threats and risks,

• has the knowledge of secret information on the mission.


CLOSE PROTECTION TEAM
• forms the inner cordon

• remains close to the VIP both during transfers and in passive situations,

• is responsible for shielding and evacuating the VIP, as well as using weapons, if necessary,

• ensures team formation and security in walking escorts and car columns,

• allows the contact between people and the VIP by permit,

• if necessary, protects the VIP’s family members depending on circumstances,

• provides minimum protection to other participants of official ceremonies and events.


SECURITY DRIVERS

• are directly responsible for the VIP’s and passengers’ security, as well as the rest of the security team while driving,

• are responsible for the technical and external (visual) condition of the car assigned to them,

• plan primary and alternate transfer routes in accordance with the Advance Team’s tips,

• identify the Choke points, Safe havens, Evac points on the routes,

• learn the routes to all hospitals and medical facilities both in the country and abroad,

• provide the highest level of physical fitness and mental agility,

• have a constant radio contact with the PSO and the rest of the security team,

• drive and learn all the transfer routes in advance,

• always provide an alternative car in case of emergency,

• the head of the security drivers appoints alternate drivers who are always readily available and fully alert,

• ensure the safety of the cars both during work and after its completion (the cars are constantly monitored, either physically or technically),


OUTSIDE SECURITY TEAM
• ADVANCE/INTELLIGENCE TEAM

 systematically receives all the updated guidelines with a copy of the complete schedule,

• gathers information in advance on the places/countries/threats/people who will have appointments with the VIP during their local/domestic or international trips,

 inspects the destinations prior to the VIP’s visit,

 thoroughly checks and secures all locations,

 is responsible for establishing contact with the persons in charge in those places, who have access to details which may considerably enhance the VIP’s security (i.e. local and state security services, hotel directors/managers, heads of security teams in the destination places, restaurant chefs, cooks, organisers, etc.),

 stays in close contact with the PSO and provides him/her with regular updates,

 draws up with the PSO a general security/evacuation plan for every location,

 provides guidelines and tips to the final plan,

 coordinates security drivers’ work and training programme



STATIC / RESIDENCE SECURITY TEAM

• the head and the PSO establish standards (SOP) and requirements on the protection of residence

• establishes and locates security cordons and control zones on the residence premises

• develops and improves security procedures (video cameras, sensors, fences),

• establishes a safe place, the so-called PANIC ROOM/SAFE ROOM inside and outside the residence,

• receives a list of persons authorised to enter the premises,

• the head knows the entire residence with all its rooms and lockers, etc.

• each passive agent becomes familiar with the entire residence area and a detailed inner plan of the building,

• the entire security team is fully familiar with the surroundings of the residence (in order to easily travel around both walking and by car),

• the head is responsible for the main Security Check of the whole personnel who work or appear on the residence premises,

• develops a control system for the persons visiting the residence or the VIP (cleaning staff, cooks, gardeners, baby-sitters, veterinary surgeons, etc.),

• conducts an inspection of the neighbours, if there are any in the nearest area,

• is responsible for gathering information,

• is responsible for a project to establish a Command Post on the premises,

• is responsible for control, constant supervision and the performance of all static agents,

• is responsible for the contact with the VIP and his/her family within the residence and reports to the Team Leader / PSO,

• a paramedic agent must always be present on the premises,

* STATIC SECURITY TEAM / OFFICE / COMPANY

• one of the greatest challenges (the building may be available to other people),

• restricted control over entering persons, unless it is the client’s own building or government premises,

• focus mainly on the protection of the VIP’s office / company, and not the entire building,

• identification agents need to be located in the building in order to monitor all the entering persons,

• forming security cordons within the building (image!)

• information security,

• developing a security system against computer / business espionage (secret information, limited access)

• special computer systems controlling the VIP’s office workers, unannounced controls of their computers,

• video surveillance of the car park and entrances performed from the security team’s office/room,

• a code to open the office and/or the building, available only to the selected staff,

• a change of all codes once a staff member is dismissed or suspended,

• developing procedures for all crisis situations,

• establishing or identifying a medical facility within the building including the VIP’s office/company (a fully equipped first-aid kit with a defibrillator)

RESIDENCE AND OFFICE SECURITY ARE KEY ELEMENTS OF THE CLIENT’S
COMPREHENSIVE SECURITY. DEVELOPING SECURITY PLANS FOR THOSE
PLACES REQUIRES A LOT OF TIME AND CLEVERNESS TO PREVENT ANY
COINCIDENCES.


* BAGGAGE TEAM / BAGGAGE AGENT

• is responsible for the security of all the baggage and other VIP’s and his/her family’s belongings during domestic and international trips,

• prepares a detailed baggage list including the description and number of bags for easier unloading and identification,

• attaches a label on each bag, which may deliberately include an error this way making the baggage difficult to recognise and mislead any third parties coming into contact with the baggage,

• assists, carries and delivers the baggage to the place of destination during domestic and international trips,


* AMBULANCE / PARAMEDIC AGENT

• key element of the security system,

• is an element / is one of the CP agents in the outer cordon around the VIP,

• is a professional paramedic with several years’ experience,

• is obliged to give medical training to all the client’s CP agents,

• selects and appoints an alternate paramedic agent,

• has the knowledge of all the diseases the VIP/the VIP’s family has suffered from, as well as their current health problems (allergies),

• is responsible for the condition of the first-aid bag and its content,

• systematically tests the members of the security team,

• participates in all domestic and international trips,

• contacts other paramedics in foreign countries during official visits and business trips,

AMBULANCES ARE AN INDISPENSABLE ELEMENT OF THE CAR COLUMNS
DURING OFFICIAL VISITS AND DOMESTIC TRANSFERS WITH THE 2ND DEGREE
THREAT


*FIRE SUPPORT AGENTS
are a crucial element of security support during official visits and domestic or international business trips,


ARE PART OF THE INTERMEDIATE AND OUTER CORDON (make a drawing!), involved in static and dynamic situations (transfers),

• the element of domestic intermediate cordon is made up of a 5-agent team specially trained for this purpose, while during international visits this is a team made up of government protection bureau officers/secret service officers (the number of them, and the need to include them in the intermediate cordon depends on the country and the current risk),

• an element of outer cordon both in the country and abroad is made up of the SWAT team, a special sniper team, the police and security services (the number of them, and the need to include them in the intermediate cordon depends on the country and the current risk),



BOMB SQUAD

• provides an auxiliary support in case of emergency,

• while in the country, this may be a team appointed within the VIP’s security team, or part of the special SWAT police unit,

• while abroad, this is typically a team included in the special SWAT police units or army troops delegated to support the security of the VIP’s visit,

• once this team together with the ADVANCE team conducts a bomb reconnaissance of all the places included in the client’s schedule, those places are directly (physically) or electronically protected (24h security),


* ALTERNATE DRIVERS

• this is a narrow group of professional drivers who demonstrate remarkable skills both in specialist offensive and defensive driving,


• they may also be compatible, and belong to the inner or intermediate cordon,





THREAT ASSESSMENT (OPPONENTS AND THEIR MOTIVES)

MAJOR ISSUES:

• TO ESTABLISH WHY SOME PEOPLE KILL / KIDNAP OTHERS – THEIR MOTIVES!

• AGAINST WHAT OR WHOM DO WE PROTECT THE VIP?

• WHEN AND WHERE CAN IT HAPPEN?

• PLAN OF ATTACK STAGE BY STAGE

• HOW DO WE PREVENT IT AND GATHER INFORMATION?

• WHAT DO OUR MISTAKES TEACH US?

GENERAL MOTIVES:

• TO BECOME FAMOUS,

• TO ATTRACT THE ATTENTION OF THE INDIVIDUAL OR PUBLIC OPINION,

• TO SATISFY ONE’S GREED,

• TO REPAIR THE WORLD OR THE COUNTRY,

• TO DEVELOP A RELATIONSHIP WITH THE KIDNAPPED PERSON,

• TO MAKE MONEY – FOR RANSOM,


• TO AFFECT THE DOMESTIC OR INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL SITUATION,

SIX MAJOR MOTIVES:

PSYCHOLOGICAL - culprits with severe personality disorder, frequently mentally ill, which causes delusions,

PERSONAL – culprits who often have an indirect or direct contact with the client and attempt murder because of revenge/jealousy. Characteristically, they are extremely suspicious, which results in their hostile relations with the environment,

ECONOMIC – the culprits commit a murder or kidnapping for purely financial reasons.
These are people with socialised conduct or social adjustment disorders.

IDEOLOGICAL – based on religious and cultural differences,

SEXUAL – typically, these people feature extreme emotional coldness and are able do camouflage and control their anxiety states.

COINCIDENTAL – the people who accidentally find themselves in an inappropriate place and time. Riots, high-risk places in the cities, nightclubs, big public events!




THREAT ANALYSIS

WHO DO WE PROTECT THE VIP AGAINST?

• his/her friends? his/her acquaintances? his/her fans? themselves?

• an individual or a group? (how big?)

• what is the level of their knowledge and professionalism?

• do they have a criminal record so that they can be easily detected?

• do they have any external support (e.g. a mole),


WHEN AND WHERE CAN THE THREAT OCCUR?

• when the VIP stays on the residence premises?

• when the VIP stays on the office/company premises?

• when the VIP is travelling?

• when the VIP gives a public speech/participates in an event?

• somewhere on the route (choke points, an ambush),


• today, tomorrow, in the nearest future, in undetermined time...


WHY DOES THE THREAT EXIST?

• what is the actual motive?

• do the media intensify the problem?

• is the motive ideologically-related?

• is there any coincidental risk (the country, political standing, trouble spots),


PLAN OF ATTACK / KIDNAPPING STAGE BY STAGE

• target selection (a particular type, a particular reason) – green stage

• gathering information on the target (passive or/and active) – amber stage,

• static and active watching – red stage,

• methodical analysis of behaviour and habits,

• fixing the time, place, method and escape route,

• completing the mission / the attack,


• escape / evacuation


ATTACK TOOLS / THREAT?

• insult, slander, provocation, ridicule (Billy Gates, Belgium 1998),

• physical force,

• poison (the toxic and radioactive isotope of polonium - Alexander Litvinenko)

• a knife, a sharp tool (small and easy to hide - Imelda Marcos 1972),

• a gun, machine gun, or sniper rifle shot (Park Chung Hee),

• an explosive device (IED) – its location (judge Falcone),

• a mass attack? (Eduard Shevardnadze)


HOW DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE EXISTING / POTENTIAL THREAT?

• a direct interview / conversation / questionnaire with the VIP,

• intelligence actions and information gathered by the Advance group,

• gathering information from friends and acquaintances,

• penetrating gangs, informants,

• a close relationship with the VIP’s immediate environment (who can always notice a detail we have overlooked),

• media informants,

• a Counter Surveillance team or agent,

• local security / police or military services,

• international co-operation, information on the threat given by the security service of the country visited by the VIP,


IT MUST BE NOTED THAT A THREAT IS CONSTANTLY CHANGING AND
EVOLVING AT VARIOUS SPEED. WE MUST BE ABLE TO SYSTEMATICALLY
EVALUATE ITS LEVEL AND ANALYSE ITS POTENTIAL IMPACT ON OUR

CURRENT SECURITY PLAN!



CASE STUDIES

ALDO MORO – the Italian Prime Minister from 1963 to 1968, between 1974 and 1976 an authority and advocate of European integration, a supporter of cooperation between the Christian Democracy and the Italian Communist Party,

• always followed the same routine and had fixed habits,

• had one route to work,

• always arrived at the same time,

• always stopped for a newspaper, and a prayer at church,

• a two-car column,

• the potential risk from the RED BRIGADES was ignored,


March 16, 1978, one of the busiest streets in Rome. Aldo Moro was on his way from home to the parliament premises. The car he was in was hit by a Fiat. Two people left it and killed the Prime Minister’s two CP agents. The other three agents from the rear Chase Car were shot by the rest of the assassins who had been waiting on the pavement in front of a cafe, dressed up in the uniforms of Italian pilots. All the CP agents were shot dead, Moro was pushed into the Fiat and all the assassins escaped. The whole action lasted shorter than one minute (image).

• how could this tragedy have been prevented?

• had Aldo Moro’s CP agents looked for the information on the potential threat?

• had they been surprised?

• should they have opened fire, or escaped from the assassins’ car on impulse?

• had there been any chance to successfully open fire?

• what was the motive for the kidnapping?

• what could have improved the VIP’s security?

• how did it end?


HANNS MARTIN SCHLEYER – the president of the German Employers’ Association.

• a residence located in a quiet residential area accessed by an extremely narrow one-way road,

• the residence was unprotected,

• many various roads led to that area,

• the attack was carried out in a bottleneck,


• very close to his residence,



On September 5, 1977 a column of cars (Schleyer’s car + CP agents’ car) was stopped on a zebra crossing by a woman with a pushchair. All of a sudden, the woman pulled out an UZI machine gun and opened fire on the driver (39 bullets), who was killed instantly. The rest of the assassins left the other car parked nearby, and opened fire on the agents from the rear car, who were also instantly killed. Only one agent pulled out a gun but failed to fire a shot. Schleyer was forced to open the door and got kidnapped.

• how could this tragedy have been prevented?

• had Martin Schleyer’s CP agents been alert and determined?

• had they been surprised?

• should they have opened fire, or escaped from the assassins’ car on impulse?

• had there been any chance to successfully open fire?

• 4 agents were shot dead within 45 seconds

• what was the motive for the kidnapping?

• what could have improved the VIP’s security?


• how did it end?

EDUARD SHEVARDNADZE – the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Soviet Union in 1991, the President of Georgia from 1995 to 2003.

• travelled in a convoy of 9-10 cars,

• had a well-organised CP team,

• the team had received many signals of the threat,

• other attempts to murder Shevardnadze had been made before,


• the CP agents had frequently chosen the same route...



On February 9, 1998, at 11 pm a convoy of 10 cars including the Shevardnadze’s car was on their way to his government residence.About 5 minutes later the whole convoy was hit by grenade-launcher and machine-gun fire from the nearby park. The convoy stopped, and while the group of agents exchanged fire with the assassins, Shevardnadze’s driver managed to drive 100 metres in the destroyed armoured Mercedes, and then the president was safely escorted by his CP agents to the residence premises. Two agents were killed, and four were wounded...

• could the attack have been prevented?

• had the CP agents been prepared to repel the attack?

• was the aim achieved?

• what was the main reason for success?

• how did it end?

RISK = MOTIVATION + ORIGIN + ABILITY + METHOD OF ATTACK



ADVANCE WORK

The information has been divided into the following stages:

• General provisions

• Arrangements prior to departure.

• Initial actions upon arrival.

• Destination reconnaissance / inspection.

• Transport.

• Emergency action.

• International trips.

• Advance briefing.

The term “Advance” refers to the responsibilities of an individual(s) visiting destination places before the Client(s) in order to make all the necessary logistic and security arrangements. 
These arrangements include securing the hotel and restaurant facilities, the vehicles, contact with the local public security services, hospitals and doctors, planning the route and determining the number of required CP agents. 
When planned thoroughly, the advance action may prevent an attack or an emergency situation.
Therefore, the advance actions are a major component of Close Protection.



ARRANGEMENTS PRIOR TO DEPARTURE.

1. Gathering information

• Assignments, dates, time, type of visit,

• Identifying other VIPs, guests, etc.,

• Budgeting,

• The VIPs’ special requirements,

• Required transport and accommodation,

• Initial threat evaluation.

2. Telephone cooperation with:

• Head Coordinator,

• Head of Accommodation,

• transport staff

- a representative of a limousine hire company,

- a representative of the aircraft charter company,

- other

- Public security services / intelligence

- federal services

- state services

- local services


• The venue of summit meetings


APPOINTMENTS MUST BE MADE WITH EACH PERSON ABOVE

3. Plan the assignment for the Advance team

a. Priority evaluation

b. Assignment – reconnaissance


c. Drawing up a control list





INITIAL ACTIONS UPON ARRIVAL

1. Effective timing:

a. at the airport – gathering information

- maps, routes, local attractions,

- an overall plan of the airport / car park,

- checking car rental offers,

b. on the way to the hotel, watch:

- the traffic and the surroundings,

- the routes and the road condition,

- the overall topography,

c. upon the arrival at the hotel

- watch the entire building,

- the hall, corridors and service facilities,

- the car park and the number of people/cars,


- entrances and exits.

2. Keep in regular contact with:

a. the headquarters of the company

- updates

- changes

b. inform the main POC about the visit

3. Priorities during the visits and reconnaissance

a. Inform all the main contacts and confirm the dates of meetings,

b. Establish priorities and draw up control lists,

4. Inspection of the surroundings

a. The agents identify their activity zone


b. All the planned stopovers must be identified





DESTINATION RECONNAISSANCE / INSPECTION
HOTELS

If possible, an initial contact should be established with the Head Manager or the Resident Manager.
It is necessary to obtain the key hotel staff’s names and numbers.

a. Head Manager

b. Resident Manager

c. Booking Manager

d. Head of security

e. Night Shift Manager

f. Restaurant staff / Banquet (Catering) Manager

g. Head Hotel Operator

h. Concierge

i. Room Service Manager


if possible, it is crucial to arrange one meeting with all the persons listed above

Building rounds

a. The surroundings

b. The occupied area / perimeter

c. The structure and plan of the building

d. Lighting

e. Fire and security systems

f. Garage

Selection of rooms

a. The Client’s suite(s)

- The suite’s arrangement and adjacent rooms (adjacent doors)

- The rooms above and below

- The distance from the staircases and lifts

- Suspended ceilings, balconies

- Window exposure

- Emergency exits

- The Clients’ special requirements – beds, a VCR, a DVD, a fridge, etc.


- Detection/identification of a “safe haven” in the suite(s).





COMMAND POST

- Its location with reference to the Client, the exits and traffic

- Furniture (special requirements)

- Furniture arrangement – the beds outside, and the tables and chairs inside

- Maps and notice boards

- An extensive telephone line/direct line

- A corridor control point (if necessary)

- Original keys or duplicates

- Floor diagrams / plans

- All the necessary information (assignment, route, etc.)

- All the necessary administrative information

- All the necessary emergency numbers

- Other details

Staff/Agents

- The Client(s) staff

- Agents in a further distance

- Provide security


- Remain in a single area or wing, if possible

The Post’s tasks

a. Control points

b. Intelligence units

c. Special tasks

Special hotel services

a. Catering services / banquets / room service

- selected menus

- flexible time

- privileges in the kitchen

- CP room service


- Food for the CPs (beverages, coffee, etc.)

b. Miscellaneous services

- a hairstylist/beautician

- a spa

- shopping

- a pharmacy

- recreation

- entertainment

- etc.

General information on the hotel

a. Formalities / a welcome ceremony upon the VIP’s arrival (if applicable)

b. Varying entrances and exits

c. If possible, the main hall should be avoided

d. The baggage

e. Bills and tips

f. Cleaning staff and the Client’s room services provided by the CPs

g. Protecting valuables


h. other



SPECIAL EVENTS/ BANQUETS / CONFERENCES

1. Arrange a meeting with the event organiser and appoint an appropriate contact person between:

a. Banquet Manager

b. catering services

c. sponsors

d. Premises Manager

e. Initiating Committee

* exchange telephone numbers

2. Establish the agenda and the type of meeting:

a. a charity event, an award ceremony, a sport event, etc.,

b. gifts

c. the moment of switching off the lights, a balloon release, the crowd’s interaction,etc.


d. a direct participation in the VIP’s event, if applicable

3. Access – the access structure

a. private or public

b. free to the public

c. tickets – how many? At what price? For whom?

d. by invitation only

e. a list of guests

f. type of crowd

g. Who will control the access?

h. How should the access be controlled?

i. Is the coverage relevant?

j. other

4. Appropriate outfit

a. Casual

b. Business


c. Formal

5. How will the seats be arranged?

a. for all guests

b. for the Client / type of privileges

c. for the agents

d. a proper arrangement of the posts

6. Floor diagrams / plans

a. entrances and exits

b. a waiting room, a guests’ room, space for the press, etc.

c. toilets / telephones

d. car park: entrance and exit

e. fire extinguishers / utility services control

f. personnel location


g. a copy to be studied by each agent

7. How will the Client arrive and depart?

a. normal conditions

b. emergency conditions

8. A waiting room, guests’ rooms, space for the press, etc.

a. where

b. what should they contain

9. Find out the location of the toilets and telephones

10. The vehicles’ arrival and departure point

a. Where will the vehicles be parked?

b. Where will the driver wait if the meeting is extended?

11. Arrangements with the catering staff

a. Type of service (i.e. a buffet, meals at the table, etc.)

b. Who will be the waiters?

c. Select the staff for the Client


d. A random selection of the menu

12. Medical security – will it be available or not?

a. A marked space for the press

b. Press conference agenda

c. How do they get access?

d. How will their identity be established?

e. Can an agent be assigned?

13. The predicted demonstrations and distracting incidents

a. The environment

b. By post/function?

•Who can do what?

•Who will give a speech to them?

•Police support

14. Analyse specific points:

a. An outdoor event – weather conditions

b. Overcrowding

c. Large crowds

d. Structural stability of the interim premises

e. IDs checked by the personnel

f. Information on the personnel, if available


g. The control of utility services on the premises

RESTAURANTS:

1. If possible, arrange a meeting with the Manager

a. Typically, these actions will be taken immediately before the visit

2. What type of visit will it be?

a. unofficial, private

b. public

c. formal, etc.

3. Selection of seats – access control to the Client (The Client’s wishes)

a. separated, private or public

b. secured, with an option of prompt evacuation

c. Separated from the flow of patrons

d. Where will the agents be posted?

e. Will they eat? How?

4. Entrances and exits

a. A standard VIP’s arrival

b. A public entrance, standard entrance for the VIP


c. emergency exit

5. Car park

a. Arrival and departure

b. Where will the vehicles wait?

c. The drivers stay with the vehicles

6. Rooms (if necessary)

a. Toilets

b. Telephone

7. A diagram / building plan (if there is enough time)

a. All the important points need to be illustrated

b. Provided to each agent

8. Other points taken into account

a. The media – should they be expected?

b. An agent and a maitre 'd to ensure privacy

c. How will they be located?

d. Traffic patterns on the route to the restaurant


e. Autographs – how does the Client want to sign them? (if applicable)




TRANSPORT
TRAVEL BY AIR – PRIVATE/CHARTERED FLIGHT

1. The main airport terminal

a. Contact the operation agent – the time of operation

b. An overall plan of the airport (topography) (diagrams)

2. Necessary information

a. The type of airplane (G-2, BAC 111, B-707, etc.)

b. Airplane number and distinguishing marks

c. The airplane owner

d. Departure point (fixed base)

e. ETD and ETA


f. Contact details of the airplane crew



3. How will the vehicles be located?

a. Arrival and departure

b. Can they approach the airplane across the apron?

c. Do they need an escort?

d. How many are allowed?

e. When can they be provided?

4. Entrance and exit ways for the vehicles

a. Changes

b. Entrance gates, the traffic, construction.

5. Rooms and facilities

a. Private telephone

b. Toilet


c. Optionally an office (if nothing else is available)

6. Special equipment

a. Airport stairs

b. Fuel

c. Special airplane security

7. The baggage and provisions

a. How much does the Client have?

b. Find out the amount and provide a monitoring system

c. What weight can the airplane lift?

d. Who will supervise the flight (if applicable)?

e. Who will load the baggage? What from? Into what vehicle?

f. Expenses

8. The agents’ weapons – the agents’ conduct on board


9. Announcing the take-off



AIR TRAVEL – COMMERCIAL AIRLINES

1. Airlines representative

a. this person may coordinate all the necessary arrangements, if required

2. A special location of the seats for the VIP and the agents

a. First-class tickets are necessary

b. Board the airplane last and leave first

3. The airplane sections

a. Typically a VIP-class/first-class

b. Telephone and toilets

4. Baggage

a. Find out the amount and provide a monitoring system

b. Provide enough porters – the agents stay with them

c. One agent keeps a baggage receipt (if necessary)


d. Request that the Client’s baggage is loaded first

5. Arrival / parking / departure

a. The action must be coordinated with the airport security

b. They can possibly assist the transfer (if applicable)

c. Parking on the apron is rather unlikely

d. It is likely that the escort’s vehicle may collect the VIP together with a small group.

6. Security

a. The airport security may not be ignored, however a representative of airport services may be present in the process

b. No agents’ weapons may be carried on board during commercial flights – the weapons must be unloaded and locked in the baggage The weapons must be declared.


c. Determine the agents’ behaviour on board


LAND TRANSPORT

1. Limousines – contact a rental company or manager

a. Necessary information

- Which type of car is accepted?

- Which colour of car is accepted?

- What facilities must a car have, if any?

- Available budget

2. Instructions for the driver (if he/she is not a member of CP)

a. Car maintenance/trunk supervision

b. The driver’s actions

c. The driver’s alertness

d. Make them feel like part of the CP team

e. How to keep in regular contact?

f. Procedures on how to drive properly in a car column

g. Will they take the cars home or leave them at the hotel? (this must be determined)


h. How to visually inspect the car

3. Planning travel route

a. While planning, include:

- Time and distance

- Traffic flow and road conditions

- Ambush threat (a covering, choke points, etc.)

- The distance from security zones and hospitals

- Lighting

- Toll booths on highways, etc.

b. Day and night driving

c. Make sure all the drivers know the route

d. Map out alternate routes

4. Car rental

a. The Advance Agent needs a car

b. A support car (if necessary)

c. A car with a manual gearbox

d. Keys for all the CPs


e. Credit cards are required

5. Car columns

a. Unofficial

- limousine, following, leading (if applicable)

b. Official/parade

- a police escort

6. Public transport – taxis, buses, trains, etc.

a. Include them as alternate transport

b. Study the timetables

c. Learn the routes


d. Are any special arrangements possible?




EMERGENCY ACTION
HOSPITALS

1. What type of facilities is available?

2. The routes between the closest hospitals and every parking place – an exact location of Accident and Emergency

3. Selection of hospitals

a. Private, public, government, military hospitals and clinics

b. 24-hour Accident and Emergency

c. Is it a shock and trauma treatment centre?

d. Does it have a burn ward?

e. The total blood reserve / is it safe?

f. VIP rooms

g. Staff and CP agents’ rooms


h. A helicopter landing pad

3. Mark the routes to hospitals on the CP map.

4. The hospital staff will require the VIP’s health details (i.e. allergies, medication, medical history, etc.)

5. If possible, find a 24-hour pharmacy





AMBULANCE

1. A commercial/volunteer ambulance

2. The reaction time during every stopover on the route

3. An emergency plan


4. Transfer in an emergency situation





THE LOCAL, STATE AND FEDERAL POLICE

1. Find out which agency/department has jurisdiction over every stopover on the route –contact them

2. Formal or informal authorisation

a. Weapons

b. Radio

c. Specialist equipment

d. Required local licences

3. Special escort

a. Officers off duty

b. Un-uniformed officers

c. Escorts from the car column

4. Emergency procedure plan

5. Possible places of transfer


6. Secret Service

INTERNATIONAL TRIPS

The Advance team’s procedures are exactly the same as above plus the following issues for international trips:

THREAT EVALUATION IN THE DESTINATION REGION

1. The evaluation must be carried out prior to the trip, and may be a separate process depending on the Client’s requirements and financial resources.




PASSPORT/VISA

1. Must be valid

2. Enough visa pages

3. Where are you going? What is in your passport?

4. Is a visa required?


5. The type of trip (a business/tourist trip, etc.)




VACCINATIONS/IMMUNITY

1. Gather up-to-date information on health issues during international trips (from the Health Ministry, etc.)

2. Ensure a sufficient reserve of the required medicine – check with a GP.


LANGUAGE AND LOCAL CUSTOMS

1. If no local agents are involved – make a local contact.

2. An interpreter/translator

3. Check with an embassy or consulate

4. The government and foreign policy


5. The local currency – what is the exchange rate?



LOCAL UNIFORMED SERVICES

1. How can they help? (Equipment, secret service, support, etc.)

2. How can they cause trouble? (surplus of units, corruption, no competences, etc.)

3. Contact with RSO (recognised security organisation)


4. Courtesy upon arrival.


COMMANDER

1. Usually receives a fuller and more extended briefing than the rest of the group.


AGENTS

1. Assignment

2. Assigned tasks

4. Contacts

5. Transport arrangements

6. ID system


7. Emergency plans and reaction tactics.




Safety rules
1. Treat all firearms as if they are loaded – SAFETY CHECK.
2. Keep your finger off the trigger and out of the trigger guard untill you are ready to shoot.
3. Never point the barrel at any living being.
4. Make sure your target and what is behind it.






BREATHING












Heckler&Koch MP5/MP5k

Caliber 9mm x 19

Barrel length 5.5in – 8.9in

Weight 2,89 – 3,1 kg

Rate of fire 800 r/min

Muzzle velocity 400 – 425m/s

Range 100 – 200m


Brügger & Thomet APC

Caliber 9mm x 19

Barrel length 7 in

Weight 2.5 kg

Rate of fire 1080 r/min

Muzzle velocity 400 m/s

Range 100m





DETECT - AVOID - COUNTER


Stay Safe My Brothers

SEMPER FI

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